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About link bars

About link bars

What is a link bar?

A link bar is a set of hyperlinks used for navigating a web site. For example, a typical link bar might have hyperlinks to the web site's home page and its main pages:



You can display a link bar on every page in your web site so that your site visitors can always get to the web site's main pages quickly and easily.
Link bars can use buttons or text hyperlinks. For example, the link bar above can also be displayed as text:

Home   News   Contents    Search


You can create a set of hyperlinks to use for navigation yourself that is, you can create your own set of buttons and link them to the relevant pages within your web site and outside it, and repeat this on each page where you want a link bar. You can also choose to set up the navigation structure of your web site, and then let Microsoft FrontPage create the link bars for you. FrontPage maintains the link bars it creates; if you move or add a page, FrontPage updates (recalculates the hyperlinks in) the link bar accordingly.


Note FrontPage can generate link bars only when you are working within a web site, rather than with separate pages.

You can create a set of hyperlinks to use for navigation yourself that is, you can create your own set of buttons and link them to the relevant pages within your web site and outside it, and repeat this on each page where you want a link bar. You can also choose to set up the navigation structure of your web site, and then let Microsoft FrontPage create the link bars for you. FrontPage maintains the link bars it creates; if you move or add a page, FrontPage updates (recalculates the hyperlinks in) the link bar accordingly.


Note FrontPage can generate link bars only when you are working within a web site, rather than with separate pages.


Types of link bars

Microsoft FrontPage has three different types of link bars you can add to your pages for navigation:

Note You can add and view any type of link bar when you publish to a disk-based web site (disk-based web site: A web site hosted on a local computer.). However, when you publish to a Web server (Web server: A computer that hosts Web pages and responds to requests from browsers. Also known as an HTTP server, a Web server stores files whose URLs begin with http://.), in order to be able to add a custom link bar or a link bar with back and next links, your Web server must have Microsoft FrontPage Server Extensions 2002 (FrontPage Server Extensions: A set of programs and scripts that support authoring in FrontPage and extend the functionality of a Web server. ) or SharePoint Team Services from Microsoft installed.

A custom link bar

When you add a custom link bar, you can add any of the pages within your web site as well as external pages. You can set this link bar up in any way you want, and you can add and remove pages from it at any time.

A link bar with back and next links

When you add a link bar with back and next links, FrontPage looks at the navigation structure of your web site in order to determine which page will be linked to when your site visitor clicks the Back link, and which one will be linked to when your visitor clicks the Next link.
In addition to these choices for a link bar, you can also include hyperlinks to the web site's home page and/or to the parent of the current page, and you can also link to external web pages.

A link bar based on the navigation structure of your web site

In order to add a link bar based on the navigation structure of your web site, you must first set up that navigation structure. The navigation structure determines which hyperlinks to put on the link bar, and the page titles determine the labels for the hyperlinks.
You can create a navigation structure for your web site by organizing pages in Navigation view. This navigation structure shows how pages in your web site are related to each other and provides FrontPage with a way to set up link bars. Then, when you add link bars based on the navigation structure of your web site, FrontPage sets up each link bar according to this structure.

The following example shows the structure of a web site:




The following is an explanation of the relationships between these pages:

Home page The first page added to a navigation structure, typically named Default.htm or Index.htm, and is indicated by . In this example, Home is the home page.

Global-level pages These are at the same level as but do not include the home page. In this example, the top-level page is Contacts.

Parent-level pages The parent page of another page, plus pages that are directly connected to the parent page on the same level. In this example, the parent-level pages for What's New are Home (the parent page), and Contacts.

Child-level pages Pages directly below another page. In this example, Home has three child pages (What's New, Products, and Services), Contact Us has one child page (Jobs), and Products has two child pages (Search and Ordering).

Same-level pages Pages that are on the same level in the structure and have the same parent page. In this example, What's New, Products, and Services are same-level pages, but Jobs is not because it has a different parent page. Search and Ordering are also same-level pages.
Back and next pages   The structure for the back and next pages is determined by the order of pages in Navigation view. In this example, if Products is the page to which you are adding the link bar, the Next link would direct the site visitor to Services and the Back link would direct the site visitor to What's New.

When you add a link bar based on the navigation structure to a page, you choose which hyperlinks you want to display. These hyperlinks are relative to the position of the page in the navigation structure.




In addition to these choices for a link bar, you can also include hyperlinks to the web site's home page and/or to the parent of the current page.

If you select navigation hyperlinks that are not relevant to the current page (for instance, you add a top-level link bar, but your web site has no top-level pages other than the home page), the link bar will not be displayed in a Web browser. You will, however, see a placeholder  (placeholders: Boxes with dotted borders that are part of most slide layouts. These boxes hold title and body text or objects such as charts, tables, and pictures.)for the link bar while you are editing the page.

Setting the style of link bars

You have several options in how you want your link bars to appear:

You can place link bars horizontally or vertically on a page
You can add more than one link bar to each page, for example to navigate to different page levels
You can format a link bar that uses text just as you would any other type of text
You can change the style of a link bar that uses buttons instead of text


Using link bars within shared borders

A shared border is a region that is common to one or more pages in a web site. Use shared borders to place the same content on multiple pages in one step, rather than editing each page.

You can also use link bars inside shared borders. However, a link bar is relative to each page a link bar might seem useful when you view it from one page, but you might not like the selection of hyperlinks when you view the link bar from a different page. Since a link bar inside a shared border has the same settings for all pages using the shared border, you must be careful how you set up the link bar.
 

 

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